Discover 16 Blue Birds in Colorado (2023 With Pictures)

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Some of the most beautiful and popular bluebirds live in Colorado. With their vibrant plumage and gentle songs, they are a welcome sight in any backyard.

Three species of bluebirds can be found in Colorado: the Mountain Bluebird, the Western Bluebird, and the Eastern Bluebird.

There are 16 types of blue birds in Colorado: the Mountain Bluebird, Blue Jay, Barn Swallow, Western Bluebird, Blue Grosbeak, Eastern Bluebird, etc.

In this blog post, we will learn more about the types of bluebirds in Colorado, including their physical characteristics, habitat, diet, and conservation status.

Blue Birds in Colorado

  1. Blue Jay
  2. Black-Throated Blue Warbler
  3. Barn Swallow
  4. Belted Kingfisher
  5. Western Bluebird
  6. Blue Grosbeak
  7. Indigo Bunting
  8. Purple Martin
  9. Steller’s Jay
  10. Eastern Bluebird
  11. Tree Swallow
  12. Mountain Bluebird
  13. Pinyon Jay
  14. Lazuli Bunting
  15. Woodhouse’s Scrub Jay
  16. Great Blue Heron

1. Blue Jay in Colorado

Blue Jay in Colorado
Image: Blue Jay in Colorado

The Blue Jay is a colorful and occasionally seen songbird in Colorado, known for its striking blue and white plumage and distinctive calls.

Recognizable by its bright colors and crest on its head, this jay adds a touch of vibrancy to the state’s woodlands and urban areas. Blue Jays are also the common species of blue birds in Michigan.

Distinctive Appearance: Blue Jays are known for their eye-catching blue and white feathers. They have a distinctive crest on their heads and a black “necklace” around their throats.

Habitat: These jays are adaptable and can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, parks, and urban areas throughout Colorado.

Diet: Blue Jays are omnivorous and have a diverse diet, including seeds, nuts, insects, and small vertebrates. They are also known to steal eggs from other birds’ nests.

Vocalizations: They are quite vocal and have a variety of calls, including their well-known “jay” call, which is loud and distinctive.

Behavior: Blue Jays are intelligent and social birds. They often gather in groups and are known for their territorial behavior, especially during the breeding season.

Nesting: They build their nests in trees, using twigs and other plant materials. Both parents share incubation and chick-rearing duties.

Conservation: Blue Jays are not considered endangered and have adapted well to human-altered landscapes.

Birdwatching Tip: If you’re interested in birdwatching, keep an eye out for Blue Jays in woodlands, parks, and even your backyard in Colorado. Their vibrant colors and lively calls make them an enjoyable sight for bird enthusiasts.

2. Black-throated Blue Warbler in Colorado

Black-throated Blue Warbler
image: Black-throated Blue Warbler

The Black-throated Blue Warbler is a small and delightful songbird that migrates through Colorado, especially during the breeding season. Black-throated Blue Warblers are also amazing types of blue birds in Florida.

You can easily spot them by their blue-gray plumage with a striking black throat patch for males, while females have a subtler version. They also have distinctive white wing patches.

Where to Find Them: During their migration, you can see them in various habitats like woodlands, forests, and shrubby areas in Colorado.

What They Eat: These warblers are insect lovers, munching on caterpillars, beetles, and spiders. They’re agile and skilled at finding food in trees and shrubs.

Chirpy Tunes: Black-throated Blue Warblers are known for their melodious songs, which consist of a series of musical notes. They also have clear and crisp calls.

Busy Little Birds: These warblers are active foragers, hopping around branches as they hunt for insects. They’re also known for their distinctive tail-wagging behavior.

Home Sweet Home: Black-throated Blue Warblers build cup-shaped nests in trees and shrubs, using twigs, grass, and leaves. Both parents share the job of incubating eggs and raising chicks.

Conservation: Fortunately, these warblers aren’t endangered, but like many migratory birds, they face challenges during their long journeys, such as habitat loss.

Birdwatching Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, head to Colorado’s woodlands and forests during the breeding season to spot these charming Black-throated Blue Warblers. Their beautiful plumage and sweet songs make them a delightful find for bird enthusiasts.

3. Barn Swallow in Colorado

Barn Swallow
Image: Barn Swallow

The Barn Swallow is a familiar and captivating bird you’ll often see in Colorado, known for its graceful flying displays and eye-catching appearance.

You can spot them by their vibrant blue and orange plumage and their distinct long tail feathers, making them a favorite among birdwatchers.

Distinctive Looks: Barn Swallows have striking blue upperparts, cinnamon-colored faces and throats, and a deeply forked tail. Their feathers are a vibrant blend of colors.

Favorite Hangouts: These swallows can be found in various open areas in Colorado, including farms, fields, and near water.

What’s on the Menu: Barn Swallows are skilled aerial hunters, dining on flying insects like flies, mosquitoes, and beetles, which they catch while in flight.

The chatter in the Air: They have a chattering and twittering call, especially when they’re flying around. You’ll often hear their calls during their acrobatic flights.

Incredible Flyers: Barn Swallows are masters of flight, performing intricate maneuvers as they chase and capture insects. They’re sociable birds and often hang out in groups.

Home Sweet Home: They build cup-shaped nests in sheltered spots like barns, bridges, and building eaves. These nests are made from mud pellets and lined with soft materials like feathers.

Staying Safe: Barn Swallows aren’t endangered, but changes in farming practices and habitat loss can affect their populations.

Birdwatching Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, keep an eye out for Barn Swallows in open areas and near water bodies in Colorado. Their graceful flight and colorful plumage make them a delightful sight for bird enthusiasts.

4. Belted Kingfisher in Colorado

Belted Kingfisher
image: Belted Kingfisher

The Belted Kingfisher is a remarkable bird found in Colorado, known for its distinctive appearance and expert fishing skills.

Recognizable by its striking blue-gray plumage, shaggy crest, and large head, this kingfisher is a captivating sight for bird enthusiasts.

Distinctive Appearance: Belted Kingfishers have a striking blue-gray plumage with a white collar. They are known for their shaggy crest on their heads and a sturdy, pointed bill.

Habitat: These kingfishers are often found near bodies of water, including rivers, lakes, and ponds, throughout Colorado.

Diet: Belted Kingfishers are expert fishers and primarily feed on fish. They use their sharp bills to dive into the water and catch their prey.

Vocalizations: They have a rattling call that sounds like a loud, harsh, and mechanical laugh. Their calls are often heard near their watery hunting grounds.

Behavior: Belted Kingfishers are skilled hunters, hovering over the water before diving headfirst to catch fish. They are known for their solitary nature and territorial behavior.

Nesting: They excavate tunnels in earthen banks near water bodies to build their nests. Both male and female kingfishers share incubation and chick-rearing duties.

Conservation: Belted Kingfishers are not considered endangered and are adaptable to various water habitats.

Birdwatching Tip: If you’re interested in birdwatching, visit rivers, lakes, and ponds in Colorado to spot Belted Kingfishers. Their distinctive appearance and impressive fishing techniques make them an exciting find for bird enthusiasts.

5. Western Bluebird in Colorado

Western Bluebird
Image: Western Bluebird

The Western Bluebird is a delightful and often-seen songbird in Colorado, known for its vibrant blue plumage and cheerful songs.

Recognizable by its striking colors and frequent visits to open areas, this bluebird adds a touch of color and melody to the state’s landscapes.

Distinctive Appearance: Western Bluebirds have bright blue feathers on their backs, wings, and tail, contrasting with their rusty-orange breast and belly. They also have a small, slender bill.

Habitat: These bluebirds are commonly found in a variety of habitats, including open woodlands, grasslands, and suburban areas throughout Colorado.

Diet: Western Bluebirds primarily feed on insects during the breeding season. In winter, they shift to a diet of fruits and berries.

Vocalizations: They have a melodious and cheerful song consisting of warbling notes. Their calls are a joy to hear on sunny days.

Behavior: Western Bluebirds are social and often seen in small family groups. They are cavity nesters and readily use nest boxes provided by bird enthusiasts.

Nesting: They build their nests in tree cavities, nest boxes, or even natural crevices. Both male and female bluebirds share incubation and chick-rearing duties.

Conservation: Western Bluebirds are not considered endangered and have benefited from the provision of nest boxes by conservation efforts.

Birdwatching Tip: If you’re interested in birdwatching, look for Western Bluebirds in open woodlands, grasslands, and suburban areas in Colorado. Their vibrant colors and beautiful songs make them a delightful find for bird enthusiasts.

6. Blue Grosbeak in Colorado

Blue Grosbeak
image: Blue Grosbeak

The Blue Grosbeak is a striking and occasionally seen songbird in Colorado, known for its vibrant blue plumage and beautiful songs.

Recognizable by its dazzling colors and melodic tunes, this grosbeak adds a touch of elegance to the state’s grasslands and shrubby areas.

Distinctive Appearance: Blue Grosbeaks have stunning deep blue plumage on their heads, backs, and wings, with warm rusty-brown feathers on their undersides. Males are particularly vibrant, while females are more subdued.

Habitat: These grosbeaks prefer open habitats like grasslands, scrublands, and forest edges, making Colorado’s diverse landscapes their ideal home.

Diet: Blue Grosbeaks primarily feed on seeds and insects. During the breeding season, they add insects to their diet to meet the nutritional needs of their chicks.

Vocalizations: They have a pleasing and melodious song that consists of a series of rich, warbling notes. Their songs are often heard during the breeding season.

Behavior: Blue Grosbeaks are often seen perched on shrubs or fence lines, singing and foraging for food. They are social birds and may gather in small groups.

Nesting: They build cup-shaped nests in dense vegetation, often close to the ground. Both male and female grosbeaks share incubation and chick-rearing responsibilities.

Conservation: Blue Grosbeaks are not considered endangered and have stable populations in their range.

Birdwatching Tip: If you’re interested in birdwatching, explore grasslands, scrublands, and forest edges in Colorado to spot Blue Grosbeaks. Their stunning appearance and beautiful songs make them a delightful find for bird enthusiasts.

7. Indigo Bunting in Colorado

Indigo Bunting
image: Indigo Bunting

The Indigo Bunting is a striking and occasionally seen songbird in Colorado, known for its brilliant blue plumage and captivating songs. Recognizable by its vibrant color and melodic tunes, this bunting adds a touch of beauty and music to the state’s woodlands and shrubby areas.

Distinctive Appearance: Indigo Buntings are renowned for their dazzling blue feathers, especially the males. Females have more muted brownish-gray plumage. They are small and slender birds with pointed bills.

Habitat: These buntings prefer a mix of open spaces and woodlands, making Colorado’s varied landscapes a suitable habitat for them.

Diet: Indigo Buntings primarily feed on seeds and insects, with a preference for seeds during the winter months.

Vocalizations: They have a sweet, melodious song that consists of a series of rich, warbling notes. Their songs are often heard during the breeding season.

Behavior: Indigo Buntings are agile and active foragers, hopping from branch to branch in search of food. They are solitary birds, and males are known for their territorial behavior during the breeding season.

Nesting: They build cup-shaped nests in dense shrubs or small trees, often a few feet above the ground. Both male and female buntings share incubation and chick-rearing duties.

Conservation: Indigo Buntings are not considered endangered and have stable populations in their range.

Birdwatching Tip: If you’re interested in birdwatching, explore woodlands and shrubby areas in Colorado to spot the Indigo Bunting. Their stunning blue plumage and enchanting songs make them a delightful find for bird enthusiasts.

8. Purple Martin in Colorado

Purple Martin
image: Purple Martin

The Purple Martin is a lovely bird in Colorado, known for its pretty purple-blue feathers and great flying skills. They like living near water and eating flying insects. You can hear them singing during the summer.

Looks: Purple Martins are small with shiny purple-blue feathers.

Where They Live: They like places near water, like lakes and wetlands.

Food: Purple Martins eat insects that fly, like mosquitoes.

Sounds: They make sweet sounds, like chattering and warbling, especially during the summer.

Flying: They’re awesome flyers, doing tricks while chasing insects.

Homes: Purple Martins live in holes, often in special houses made for them.

Friends and Family: They are social and live together in groups, helping each other raise their young ones.

Safety: Purple Martins are not in danger, but they need good places to nest.

Spotting Tip: Look for Purple Martins near water during the summer in Colorado. Their pretty colors and cool flying moves make them a fun bird to watch.

9. Steller’s Jay in Colorado

Steller's Jay
Image: Steller’s Jay

Steller’s Jay is a clever and often-spotted bird in Colorado, known for its striking blue and black feathers and smart ways. You can recognize it by its bright colors and unique call, adding charm to Colorado’s woods and mountains.

Looks: Steller’s Jays have deep blue feathers with blackheads and crests. They also wear white on their faces.

Home Sweet Home: These jays often hang out in forests, mountains, and even neighborhoods in Colorado.

Food: Steller’s Jays eat a mix of things like insects, seeds, fruits, and even small animals. They’re fans of acorns, too.

Talkative Birds: They have many calls, including a loud “Shree” sound. You’ll often hear them chattering in their homes.

Smart Behavior: Steller’s Jays are smart and quick learners. They like to hide food in secret spots for later snacks.

Where They Live: They build nests in trees using twigs, moss, and bark. Moms and dads both help with nest-building and taking care of the baby jays.

Doing Well: Steller’s Jays are not in danger, and they do well in different places.

Spotting Tip: If you’re into birdwatching, visit forests and mountains in Colorado to find Steller’s Jays. Their bright colors and clever tricks make them fun to watch.

10. Eastern Bluebird in Colorado

eastern bluebirds
Image: Eastern Bluebirds

The Eastern Bluebird is a lovely and occasional bird in Colorado, known for its bright blue feathers and sweet songs. You can recognize them by their pretty colors and beautiful tunes, adding charm to open spaces and woods in the state.

Looks: Eastern Bluebirds have bright blue feathers on their backs and wings, with an orange belly. They also wear a white “shirt” and have a small bill.

Home Sweet Home: These bluebirds like open places like meadows, farms, and neighborhoods in Colorado.

Food: Eastern Bluebirds mostly eat insects when they’re breeding. In winter, they switch to fruits and berries.

Sounds: They sing sweet songs with warbling notes, especially during breeding season.

Active Birds: Eastern Bluebirds hunt insects from perches, then swoop down to catch them. They’re also friendly and often seen in small groups.

Nesting: They build cup-shaped nests in tree holes, nest boxes, or cracks in trees. Moms and dads both help hatch eggs and raise chicks.

Safe and Sound: Eastern Bluebirds are not in danger, and they benefit from special birdhouses set up for them.

Spotting Tip: If you like birdwatching, visit open areas, meadows, and suburban spots in Colorado to find Eastern Bluebirds. Their pretty colors and lovely songs make them a joy to discover.

11. Tree Swallow in Colorado

Tree Swallow
image: Tree Swallow

The Tree Swallow is a graceful and often-spotted bird in Colorado, known for its shiny blue-green feathers and amazing flying skills. You can recognize them by their glossy colors and agile moves, bringing a touch of elegance to Colorado’s skies, especially during the breeding season.

Looks: Tree Swallows have shiny blue-green feathers on their backs and wings, with a white tummy and a slender body. They also have a bit of a forked tail.

Home Sweet Home: These swallows prefer places near water, like lakes and ponds, all over Colorado.

Food: Tree Swallows are insect lovers, catching flying bugs while they’re in the air.

Sounds: They make soft, twittering sounds and chit-chat while sitting or flying around.

Fancy Flyers: Tree Swallows are amazing at flying, doing cool moves to catch insects. Sometimes you’ll see them flying together in a group.

Nesting: They make their homes in tree holes, special birdhouses, or even gaps in buildings. Moms and dads both help keep the eggs warm and take care of the babies.

Doing Okay: Tree Swallows are not in danger, and they can live in different places.

Spotting Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, visit areas close to the water in Colorado when it’s the breeding season to find Tree Swallows. Their smooth flying and shiny feathers make them a beautiful sight for bird fans.

12. Mountain Bluebird in Colorado

bluebirds in Florida

The Mountain Bluebird is a beautiful and sometimes-seen bird in Colorado, known for its striking sky-blue feathers and graceful presence. You can spot them by their bright color and sweet songs, which bring beauty and music to Colorado’s open areas and mountain regions.

Looks: Mountain Bluebirds have dazzling sky-blue feathers on their backs and wings, with a lighter blue or white tummy. They have a slim, neat body.

Home Sweet Home: These bluebirds prefer open spaces like meadows, high mountains, and grasslands all over Colorado.

Food: Mountain Bluebirds mainly eat insects, like grasshoppers and ants, which they find on the ground or catch while flying.

Sounds: They sing sweet songs with warbling and trilling notes, especially when they’re looking for a mate.

Active Birds: Mountain Bluebirds like to perch on fences and branches to look for food. They’re also good at hovering in the air while hunting.

Nesting: They build cup-shaped nests in tree holes, birdhouses, or even holes in the ground. Moms and dads share the job of keeping the eggs warm and taking care of the babies.

Doing Fine: Mountain Bluebirds are not in danger, and their numbers are steady.

Spotting Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, explore meadows, grasslands, and mountain areas in Colorado to find Mountain Bluebirds. Their bright feathers and lovely songs make them a delightful sight for bird lovers.

13. Pinyon Jay in Colorado

Pinyon Jay
Image: Pinyon Jay

The Pinyon Jay is a special and sometimes-seen bird in Colorado, known for its dusty blue-gray feathers and love for hanging out with friends. You can spot them by their unique look and lively behavior, making them stand out in Colorado’s high desert and pinyon-juniper woodlands.

Unique Appearance: Pinyon Jays have dusty blue-gray feathers with a bit of a crest on their heads and a light-colored beak. They might look a bit scruffy.

Where They Live: These jays like to call pinyon-juniper woodlands and high desert areas in Colorado their home.

Favorite Food: Pinyon Jays mainly eat pine seeds, especially from pine cones. They play an important role in spreading these seeds around.

Sounds They Make: You’ll hear them making all sorts of sounds, from harsh caws to chattering, especially when they’re in their big groups.

Social Birds: Pinyon Jays are super social and often hang out in large flocks. They’re also great at storing food for later.

Nesting: They build nests in trees and bushes to lay their eggs. What’s interesting is that many in the flock help take care of the baby jays.

Doing Fine: Pinyon Jays are not in danger, but their numbers can be affected if there aren’t enough pine seeds for them to eat.

Spotting Tip: If you’re into birdwatching, check out pinyon-juniper woodlands and high desert areas in Colorado to find Pinyon Jays. Their special look and friendly behavior make them a fun find for bird fans.

14. Lazuli Bunting in Colorado

lazuli bunting
Image: Lazuli Bunting

The Lazuli Bunting is a bright and sometimes-spotted bird in Colorado, known for its stunning blue feathers and sweet songs. You can recognize them by their dazzling colors and lovely tunes, bringing beauty and music to open areas and woods in the state.

Unique Looks: Lazuli Buntings have vibrant blue feathers on their heads, backs, and wings, with a touch of rusty orange on their bellies. They’re slim and sleek.

Where They Live: These buntings like hanging out in open spaces like grasslands, shrubby areas, and woods all over Colorado.

Favorite Foods: Lazuli Buntings mostly eat insects when it’s breeding season. In winter, they switch to seeds and berries.

Beautiful Sounds: They sing sweet songs with warbling and trilling notes, especially when they’re looking for a mate.

Active Birds: Lazuli Buntings are busy little birds, hopping from branch to branch to find food. They like to be alone, especially when they’re looking for a partner.

Nesting Nooks: They make cup-shaped nests in shrubs or small trees, often close to the ground. Moms and dads both help keep the eggs warm and take care of the baby buntings.

Doing Well: Lazuli Buntings are not in danger, and their numbers are steady.

Spotting Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, check out grasslands, shrubby areas, and woods in Colorado to spot Lazuli Buntings. Their colorful feathers and sweet songs make them a wonderful find for bird lovers.

15. Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay in Colorado

Woodhouse's Scrub Jay
Image: Woodhouse’s Scrub Jay

Woodhouse’s scrub jay is a friendly and often-seen bird in Colorado, known for its bright blue feathers and lively nature. You can spot them by their colorful appearance, which adds charm to Colorado’s open spaces and woodlands.

Unique Looks: Woodhouse’s Scrub Jays have bright blue feathers on their backs, wings, and tails, with a grayish belly. They also have a bit of a crest on their heads.

Where They Live: These jays like to call open areas, including woodlands, chaparral, and suburban neighborhoods in Colorado, their home.

Favorite Foods: Woodhouse’s Scrub Jays enjoy a mix of foods, including insects, seeds, and even small animals. They can also be seen eating acorns.

Chatty Birds: You’ll often hear them making a variety of sounds, from loud calls to chattering, especially when they’re in their groups.

Social Birds: These jays are quite social and like to hang out in small family groups.

Nesting: They build nests in trees or shrubs to lay their eggs. Moms and dads both help take care of the baby jays.

Doing Fine: Woodhouse’s Scrub Jays are not in danger, and they do well in different places.

Spotting Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, keep an eye out for Woodhouse’s Scrub Jays in open areas, woodlands, and even suburban neighborhoods in Colorado. Their colorful feathers and lively behavior make them a fun find for bird fans.

16. Great Blue Heron in Colorado

Great Blue Heron
image: Great Blue Heron

The Great Blue Heron is a tall and often-seen bird in Colorado, known for its elegant appearance and slow, deliberate movements. You can recognize them by their size and long legs, which make them stand out near water bodies in Colorado.

Distinctive Looks: Great Blue Herons are large birds with grayish-blue feathers, long necks, and long legs. They also have a sharp, pointed beak.

Habitat: These herons like to hang out near water, such as lakes, rivers, and wetlands, all over Colorado.

Favorite Foods: Great Blue Herons are expert hunters, feeding on fish, frogs, and other small creatures they find in the water.

Quiet Birds: You’ll often see them standing still or moving very slowly near the water, waiting for their next meal. They don’t make much noise.

Hunting Style: They use their long beaks to spear their prey with precision.

Nesting: Great Blue Herons build large stick nests in trees near water. They often nest in colonies with other herons.

Doing Well: These herons are not in danger, and their populations are stable.

Spotting Tip: If you enjoy birdwatching, look for Great Blue Herons near water bodies in Colorado. Their tall, statuesque figures and patient hunting style make them easy to spot and observe.

Conclusion

Bluebirds are a wonderful addition to any Colorado backyard. With their vibrant plumage and gentle songs, they are a joy to watch and listen to. By following the tips in this blog post, you can help attract bluebirds to your yard and create a welcoming habitat for these beautiful birds.

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